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Passing Marken - April 22

Lunch while Cruising to Hoorn

semi-overcast
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Then the boat started for Hoorn.

sailboat from the AmaViola

sailboat from the AmaViola


We got a chance to see the boat go through a lock on the way there
IMG_4727.jpgIMG_4729.jpgDirectional lock signs

Directional lock signs

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Windsock on the opposite lock

Windsock on the opposite lock

Lock

Lock

lock house

lock house

Side of the lock

Side of the lock

and we ate lunch during the trip. I managed to do the
salad bar

salad bar


and then had
vegetable broth

vegetable broth


and
spaghetti

spaghetti

Although I was not able to actually get to Marken on my 2016 trip, I did photograph the Paard van Marken (the Marken lighthouse) twice from the IJsselmeer on our way to and from Hoorn.
Lighthouse from a distance

Lighthouse from a distance


Marken lighthouse

Marken lighthouse

Marken lighthouse

Marken lighthouse


The lighthouse is located at the eastern tip of the island of Marken, in the Markermeer about 19 miles northeast of Amsterdam. Because of its profile as seen from a distance, the lighthouse is traditionally called het Paard van Marken (the horse of Marken).
Paard van Marken

Paard van Marken

It is a good walk from the village. The lighthouse was built in 1839 by J. Valk on a site of a more primitive tower that was on this site dating from about 1700. The focal plane (height of the light) is 53 ft. The lighthouse is active and has a white light oscillating once every 8 seconds. The lighthouse consists of a round brick tower with lantern and gallery, attached to a 2-story keeper's house. The lighthouse is painted white; lantern dome is red.
Markem lighthouse from a ship

Markem lighthouse from a ship


In the winter, northeast winds funnel ice down the IJsselmeer toward the lighthouse, sometimes endangering the buildings; the original keeper's house was destroyed by ice in 1879, the present keeper's house was heavily damaged in 1900, and in 1971 ice reached the roof of the keeper's house. The lantern was replaced in 1992, and the fog horn was deactivated in 2001. The lighthouse was declared a national monument in 1970. The lighthouse is privately owned and is occupied at the moment.
Lighthouse at dusk

Lighthouse at dusk

Sunset on the IJsselmeer

Sunset on the IJsselmeer

Markem Lighthouse at sunset

Markem Lighthouse at sunset


We were originally to dock in Volendam, but they changed the itinerary and instead we docked in Hoorn. This was a great disappointment to me because I particularly wanted to get to Volendam on the ship. We had the option go on a walk of Hoorn or take a bus to Edam and Volendam. I wanted to go to Volendam, so that was what we did. I did not realize that I could have just gotten a taxi to Volendam from Hoorn instead of taking the tour. When we got to Hoorn, we were rafted between AmaStella (outboard of us) and a Viking ship (on the dock) We could not just walk across the Viking ship because the decks did not match. So we had to walk up to the Sun Deck (the top deck), cross our Sun Deck, walk across the bridge to the top deck of the Viking ship and then walk down to the dock level. One of the ship crew, thinking he was helping took the scooter all the way to the dock. That meant I had not only to walk up the steps to the Sun Deck (would not be a problem) but walk down the deck, and across the two decks and up the other deck and down some stairs. At that point I said I knew that the Viking ship had an elevator, so I took that down to the dock.

Viking ship next to the dock

Viking ship next to the dock


Hoorn was the capitol of West Friesland and was once more powerful than Amsterdam. In May 1615, Dutch explorers Abel Tasman and Willem Schouten left from Hoorn to make the first trip around Cape Horn to the Pacific. Cape Horn is named after Hoorn, the birth place of Schouten. Another famous son of Hoorn is Jacob Coen who founded Jakarta in Indonesia, and consolidated Dutch power in the East.

All I saw of Hoorn was the walk to the bus and the drive out to Edam. As we walked (I was on the scooter) to the bus. I was trying to take photos with one hand and steer the scooter with the other, and I ran up on someone's heels (he stopped unexpectedly)
Street of Hoorn

Street of Hoorn

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The Hoofdtoren (the Main Tower) is a tower near the harbor which was built for defense in 1532. It's made of limestone and brick I took photos of it as we left the harbor
The Hoofdtoren (The Head Tower)

The Hoofdtoren (The Head Tower)

Hoofdtoren

Hoofdtoren


I understand that it is now a bar and restaurant. Next to it is a statue of the cabin boys of Bontekoe. It is a historic monument

Another of the things we saw on the way to Edam was Koepelkerk.(the Dome Church),
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built in 1882, was designed by the Hoorn architect AC Bleys. The church served two parishes - the Roman Catholic parishes of St Cyriacus and St. Francis. The main church was dedicated to St. Cyriacus. The chapel of east of St Frances was no longer in use because there were no Franciscans who could read Mass. When the Church in the Back Street burned down in 1877, they used that site to build the new church. The church fell into disrepair and funds had to be raised to rescue it from collapse. It is now a listed building and still has church services on Sunday.
Koepelkerk church

Koepelkerk church


De Posthoorn Hotel - Hoorn

De Posthoorn Hotel - Hoorn


I saw this lighthouse from the the dining room of the AmaViola after we left Hoorn and was able to get two good photos.. The Hoorn West Havendam lighthouse is located at the end of the west breakwater at Hoorn, a town on the Markermeer about 13 miles southwest of Enkhuizen. The date of construction is unknown although we do know that a station was established here in the 1600s. It shows a white light, 2 seconds on, 2 seconds off. on a wood post with quadrupod bracing, painted black. There is a red and white post nearby.
Hoorn West Havendam Lighthouse

Hoorn West Havendam Lighthouse

Hoorn West Havendam Lighthouse

Hoorn West Havendam Lighthouse

engraving of the Hoorn West Havendam Lighthouse

engraving of the Hoorn West Havendam Lighthouse

Posted by greatgrandmaR 10:49 Archived in Netherlands Tagged volendam edam hoorn cruise_ship_visit Comments (0)

Mis-Scheduled Visit to Volendam - 22 April

Afternoon Walking Tour of Edam

semi-overcast
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Marina in Hoorn

Marina in Hoorn


We drove to Edam on a road by a dike,
416940977616325-Bus_on_the_r..r_bus_Edam.jpgRoad along a canal

Road along a canal

Road signs

Road signs

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passing sheep and cows and ducklings, and
Tulip fields

Tulip fields


We got to Edam about 4. This is the a parking lot where they let us off the bus
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The first drop-off point was also the local bus stop for buses coming to Edam. There are tours from the Central Station in Amsterdam to Edam and Volendam. You take bus 514 to Edam (10 €) There are also ways that you can rent a bike. We did the
Walking tour

Walking tour


Edam is a pretty little town. The buildings reflect the wealth of the Golden Age. It was an important ship building and trade center. But when the harbor silted up in the 17th century, Edam declined, and today the biggest industry is tourism
Interesting doorway

Interesting doorway


We saw some typical Dutch bridges on our walking tour of Edam. Two of them were near where we got off the bus near Klein Westerbuten -Oosthuizerweg. The most picturesque bridge was the
7634750-Canal_Bridges.jpgKwakelbrug bridge on Schepenmakersdijk

Kwakelbrug bridge on Schepenmakersdijk


Small waterways like canals with a lot of boat traffic need to have bridges which are quickly and easily lifted. These are called "Tall Bridges" A tall bridge is a stripped down version of a bascule bridge with one lever. A tall bridge can quickly and efficiently be raised and lowered from one pylon (instead of hinges). This quickly allows water traffic to pass while only briefly stalling road traffic. A small bridge could rest on only one pylon, which is advantageous because it consumes less materials and energy
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Edam canal

Edam canal

7634737-Tea_Houses_of_Schepenmakersdijk_Edam.jpg7634736-Tea_Houses_of_Schepenmakersdijk_Edam.jpgTea Houses of Schepenmakersdijk

Tea Houses of Schepenmakersdijk

7634738-Tea_Houses_of_Schepenmakersdijk_Edam.jpgTea Houses of Schepenmakersdijk

Tea Houses of Schepenmakersdijk

Window detail

Window detail


One of the things that the guide would point out was how the fronts of the houses had that typical old style Dutch architecture with the stepped gables. There were several different styles - some had more "steps" than others. Unfortunately, I didn't take note when I took the pictures, what buildings I was taking photos of.
Single swoopy top

Single swoopy top

Two houses - one plain, one with 7 steps

Two houses - one plain, one with 7 steps

Five steps

Five steps

Building with stepped gable and crest

Building with stepped gable and crest

Sign translates as Dutch Water Board

Sign translates as Dutch Water Board

The Crescent Moon

The Crescent Moon

Ladies clothing store - nieuwe collectie

Ladies clothing store - nieuwe collectie


Shop - Drogisterij de Graaf (Beauty supplies)

Shop - Drogisterij de Graaf (Beauty supplies)


7634875-A_flower_shop_on_the_way_Edam.jpgFlower shop

Flower shop


Verse Boerderij Friet

Verse Boerderij Friet


approaching The Speeltoren

approaching The Speeltoren


The Speeltoren

The Speeltoren


We saw the Speeltoren clock tower on our visit, but either I wasn't listening to the tour guide or she didn't mention that this was a 15th century carillon tower with 19 bells. I figured it out by looking at my photo. The octagonal part of the tower is made of sandstone and dates from the 16th century. The tower was restored in 1764 and also 1922 to 1924 and in 1972. The 1972 restoration apparently de-stabilized the tower and it had to be "further consolidated", The original device that rings the bells has been replaced so the bells can now be heard. They ring every 15 minutes. But I don't remember hearing them. Probably because I had the guide's voice for our group in one ear. Apparently the tower was originally part of the 13th century Our Lady a small church which was demolished in the 19th century. It is now a one of Netherlands historic monuments. The page about the carillon says "..the first chimes of 1547 were replaced in 1569 by a carillon from the Great Church. This carillon restored in 1999 consists of 19 bells, four of which were cast by Pieter van den Gheyn (1561).
7634618-The_Speeltoren.jpgold etching of The Speeltoren

old etching of The Speeltoren


I followed the group on my scooter up to the point where she took everyone up on a steep bridge. This apparently was formerly a lock which has been made into a bridge. I felt it was too steep for me to attempt on the scooter, so I asked Bob to go up and take photos from there. I probably could have gotten up there (with several people pushing), but coming down would have been hazardous. So I decided not to go up there.
me in the pink coat following the group

me in the pink coat following the group


Bob went up and took photos. The page which lists all the monuments (listed buildings) says: Damsluis, wide overpass at the western end of the Voorhaven, placed according to the dates of the keystones in the present form in 1795- '98. It has iron railings; on the west side it still says XVI A. The quays east of the overpass have two courses of stone from 1701. At the top of the bridge you can see the Town Hall
Town Hall

Town Hall

Town Hall

Town Hall

7634799-Damsluis_and_Dam_Square.jpgDamsluis and Dam Square

Damsluis and Dam Square


I just took photos from the street beside it.
Damhotel next to Dam Square

Damhotel next to Dam Square


7634801-Damsluis_and_Dam_Square.jpg
Then we found someone from the AmaStella blue group who had lost her group. (Each guide had a colored paddle to hold up for us to follow).
Guide of the Green group

Guide of the Green group


The cheese market is no longer the heart of the town. There is a smaller (smaller than the main one in Alkmaar) Cheese Market re-enactment in Edam on Wednesdays in the summer. We were there on Friday in April, so of course did not see it then. The original and actual market in Edam closed in 1922, and the re-enactment for tourists started in 1989. There is a statue of the cheese porters called De Kaasdragers outside of the weigh house which was placed there in 2013 at the celebration of the 25 year jubilee of the Edam cheese market society.
statue of De Kaasdragers (Cheese porters)

statue of De Kaasdragers (Cheese porters)


Old weigh house from 1778

Old weigh house from 1778


The weigh house with the brightly decorated facade dates from 1778
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I went into the Edam cheese weighing station to get out of the wind. Even if you are not there on Wednesday, the weigh house is open and has an exhibit showing how cheese is made.
Bob's photo of me heading for the Cheese weigh station

Bob's photo of me heading for the Cheese weigh station


There was a description of the process inside
7634756-Cheese_Market.jpg7634854-_Edam.jpg7634856-_Edam.jpg 7634858-_Edam.jpg
Scale

Scale


The brochure for this tour said we were to have a cheese tasting,
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but we didn't get to that and Raul, the cruise director said it was just that there were places in Edam where we could taste cheese, but it wasn't actually part of the tour. If I had known that, I would have gone in and done some cheese tasting. But I was waiting for the guide to take us to where we would taste cheese. I was anxious to reach Volendam, so I did not stop or shop in Edam. This shop is located in a listed building which dates from the 16th century. From 1947 is a cheese specialty shop located here and from 1990 it is run by Bessel van Veen, who has a huge passion for everything to do with cheese and wine
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Just before we got back to the bus (which drove around and met us on the other side of the town),
Approaching the Grote Kerk on Grote Kerkstraat

Approaching the Grote Kerk on Grote Kerkstraat


Steeple of Grote Kerk

Steeple of Grote Kerk

Sign outside the church door

Sign outside the church door


Bob and I saw a cemetery - the Algemene Begraafplaats Edam (which means something like Edam General Cemetery) and went in and took a few photos.
Gate to Algemene Begraafplaats Edam

Gate to Algemene Begraafplaats Edam

Graves with the wall of Grote Kerk behind them

Graves with the wall of Grote Kerk behind them


We didn't have time to go in the church. Then we got on the bus and went a short distance to Volendam. When we got to Volendam, one of the men refused to get off the bus. We could hear the guide pleading with him and his absolute refusal. He said his leg hurt. So he didn't get off the bus. We were walking through the town when the guide got a call - we had left two people in Edam and they were coming by taxi - where should they meet her. So she handed over to the other guide with us (Raul the cruise manager said they had sent him to help me, but the guide himself said that they had arranged for 4 buses and only needed 3).
Main street in Volendam

Main street in Volendam


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He told me to go around and meet him at the hotel (he said there was only one) as he was going to lead the group up some steps. I did meet them.
The Hotel meeting place - Volendam

The Hotel meeting place - Volendam


I had prints of the photos that Daddy took in 1950 - two from Volendam and one which the guide identified as Markem. I was disappointed in Volendam - I expected to see people still wearing native dress, but they were not. Although apparently one of the things that one must do (if one is Dutch) when one visits Volendam is to have a photo taken in costume.
National Dress

National Dress


I went into a photography shop (one where you could have your photo taken in costume) and showed the photos to one of the ladies and she brought the shop manager out. The shop manager explained the difference between the costumes that the girls in one photo were wearing (she said she would have been about 3 years old in 1950) and said she knew the man at the fish stall but couldn't remember his name.
My sister and me in 1950 - Netherlands

My sister and me in 1950 - Netherlands


She also said that the very shop that I was in was in one of the photos. So I made a collage of the two photos
Then (1950) and Now (2016) - Volendam

Then (1950) and Now (2016) - Volendam


After we were all re-united we walked back to the bus
Waterfront of Volendam

Waterfront of Volendam


There was one stairway which the scooter had to be carried down. And we drove back to Hoorn and walked back to the ship. This time, the AmaViola was right next to the pier - no need to climb across a Viking ship.
Bob on the left - walking back to the AmaViola

Bob on the left - walking back to the AmaViola


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This was Dutch night for cuisine. I had beef carpaccio
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and cheese soup. Bob ordered the chicken consume
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and when I looked at my soup it didn't look like cheese soup -- Bob had my soup and I had his. We switched. We both had chicken breast with curry sauce and rice.
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I didn't like mine and my back was hurting so I couldn't get comfortable and Bob had a problem swallowing his dinner. He ordered hot tea, but it was too late.
Dutch Apple Cake

Dutch Apple Cake


For dessert I had the Dutch apple cake but Bob's banana split sundae looked good too.

Posted by greatgrandmaR 13:08 Archived in Netherlands Tagged volendam edam cruise_ship_visit Comments (0)

Het Loo-Handicapped Accessible Palace - 23 April

Royal Palace of the Dutch


View 2015 Costa Rica (plus 1996 and 2008) & 2016 Tulip Cruise on greatgrandmaR's travel map.

Last night, I downloaded photos and then I went to sleep with the TV on, and my glasses on too. Bob got up and turned off the TV. But this morning, I couldn't find my glasses. I tore everything apart looking for them (and missed many idyllic photos as we were
Coming into Arnhem)

Coming into Arnhem)


but did not find them until Bob looked under the bed (where I had looked several times previously, but you really can't see to find your glasses if you need glasses). After Bob found my glasses, we had to get to breakfast ASAP as our tour was leaving at 9:00, and it was now almost 8. I was afraid to order something so Bob just got me a selection from the buffet.
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Our table companions were a widow from Costa Rica and a widower from Austria who were traveling together and a lady from Canada. After we ate, I put on my sweater (and Bob put on one too) and we got our safety cards (cards which you take with you when you leave the ship) and our color card for the tour (ours was yellow). We put on our communication devices set to yellow, and went out and got on the bus.
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We were about the first ones on. Our guide this time had his microphone on the whole time and did not know it so I heard a lot of stuff that I probably was not meant to hear. But a lot of it was in Dutch so I didn't understand it.
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We had two choices of tours today - one to Arnhem Bridge & Arnhem Airborne Museum and the other to Het Loo Palace. I decided on the palace, which was the residence of the Dutch Royal Family until quite recently and was said to have been restored to be 'cozy' as if the family could still live there. I was thinking something like Queluz. It was a little more like Peterhof I think. Our guide was a sort of doddery old man, but at one point he said that when the Nazi's told everyone in Arnheim to leave in 1944, he was two years old - so that made him two years younger than my sister and about five years younger than I am. The day was mostly sunny, but windy.
house in Arnhem

house in Arnhem


Road to Het Loo

Road to Het Loo


We drove past a big pink bicycle and some pink bicycles on lamp posts - that is apparently for a bike race ending in Italy which is sponsored by what the guide said was a pink newspaper - whatever that it.
Pink Bikes

Pink Bikes


We got to the palace about 10,
Welcome sign at the gate

Welcome sign at the gate


along with another bus from our boat, a couple of Viking buses, a couple from AmaStella and at least two other buses. The roads and paths around the palace were paved with brick which made the going very bumpy, but not as bad a gravel or actual cobblestones.
Path to the Palace

Path to the Palace


Diagram - we walked from the lower left to the red area

Diagram - we walked from the lower left to the red area


We got our tickets from the guide
Ticket

Ticket

From the entrance building to the courtyard

From the entrance building to the courtyard

Queen Julianna statue

Queen Julianna statue


and also a booklet explaining the palace, and he tried to explain the various monarchs - Kings and Stadhouders which were apparently place-holders for Lords or Princes. I didn't understand it until I looked it up later.

As we exited the Entrance building we entered the Stables Square (with peacocks on the lawns).

Royal Stables

Royal Stables


The stables were built between 1907 and 1909 at the orders of Queen Wilhelmina (1880-1962). The stable had room for 88 horses. Most of the horses are gone but there are two retired horses still in the stables.
Royal Stables

Royal Stables

Royal Stables

Royal Stables


A section of the stables is still used by the Royal Stables in The Hague. In the middle are two large coach houses. Royal carriages and sleighs as well as liveries (uniforms of the coachmen) are on display here. We didn't visit here because by the time I got back to this area my back was too painful for me to continue
Royal Garage

Royal Garage


Opposite the Royal Stables was the Prins Hendrik Garage. In the 1920s when horses and carriages were replaced by cars, Prince Hendrik, the husband of Queen Wilhelmina had this addition built for the cars. Highlight of the collection is the Cadillac Convertible Sedan. The car was bought in 1949 and used by Princess Wilhelmina. Near the Prins Hendrik Garage there is a playground for children.
Diagram of the site - Entrance lower left

Diagram of the site - Entrance lower left


The palace has two restaurants and a Kiosk. We didn't see the Kiosk which is at the back of the gardens behind the Colonnades.
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We didn't go out into the gardens because it was cold and the pathways were gravel which might have been difficult with a scooter.
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The first restaurant we saw was the Grand Cafe of Paleis Het Loo at the Prins Hendrik Garage. It is a self-service restaurant. This restaurant is outside the gate where they take your ticket. You do not have to pay for admission to go to the stables, this restaurant or the playground.

Tickets are punched at the palace gate. First we went to a building which houses the second restaurant - Restaurant de Balzaal which is located in the west wing of the palace and overlooks the croquet court. That restaurant was not open when we were there - it is the one which is in the former palace kitchens and can be set up as a ballroom. The walls are covered with hunting tableaux painted on gold leather from the Rubens estate.
Restaurant/Ballroom

Restaurant/Ballroom


large_7729318-Two_Restaurants_And_A_Kiosk.jpg7729320-Two_Restaurants_And_A_Kiosk.jpg7729321-Two_Restaurants_And_A_Kiosk.jpgModel of the Groene Draeck

Model of the Groene Draeck

Dinner services

Dinner services

Display case and stairway

Display case and stairway


Before and after we entered at the gate, we took some photos of the palace itself. The guide explained that when Napoleon's brother lived here, he had the palace plastered in white. When the decision was made to make the palace into a museum, it was restored to the original 17th century appearance outside (i.e. they removed the plaster) We did not go to the West Wing which has temporary exhibits.
West wing

West wing


Palace through the trees

Palace through the trees


Blue Entrance booths

Blue Entrance booths


Outside the fence of the palace

Outside the fence of the palace


Lawn area with tree before we entered the East Wing

Lawn area with tree before we entered the East Wing


The guy at the gate who punched our tickets said that the elevator was on the left.
East wing from outside the palace gates

East wing from outside the palace gates

Fountain in the middle of the palace entrance

Fountain in the middle of the palace entrance


Flag on the palace

Flag on the palace


Eventually our guide pointed us to the left and said to go in that way instead of going down the steps with the dangerous step at the bottom. We rang the intercom bell and someone came and unlocked the door and we went in - there was an elevator there to take us up to the first floor.
Disabled Access To Het Loo Palace

Disabled Access To Het Loo Palace


We did not do the tour in order - we started out at Prins Hendrik's Staircase #29 and then went to #31 the Hunting Room of Prince Henrick which had a wall covered with hunting trophies (antlers), and also a cuckoo clock. At the end of the first floor and we went up the elevator to the second floor. But for the purposes of this narrative, I am putting the photos in the order in which one would normally encounter them.

The Het Loo Palace was the former residence of the Royal Family of the Netherlands. It was open to the public after the restoration of 1984. In 1684, stadtholder Willem III (1650-1702) purchased the medieval hunting lodge ‘Het Oude Loo’ together with the surrounding buildings, woods, estates and water courses. He wanted to build a new hunting lodge on this site, one which would compete with the country estates of other European royalty. There are more than thirty rooms in the Palace which are numbered and organized more or less in chronological order.
Fireplace in the Vestibule (Room #1)

Fireplace in the Vestibule (Room #1)


The first place most visitors see is the Vestibule or Entrance Hall which is hung with tapestries.
Het Loo Palace #1

Het Loo Palace #1


Het Loo Palace #1

Het Loo Palace #1


The sign in the room tells us about the portrait of Willem III when he was King of England,
Willem III

Willem III


and also Queen Mary II his wife.
Het Loo Palace #1

Het Loo Palace #1


After you exit the Vestibule, you go into room #2, the Bentinck Room (behind the audio tour counter)

#2 Bentinck Room

#2 Bentinck Room


which is named for Hans Willem Bentinck, the Duke of Portland. He was an advisor for Willem III. The ceiling with painted clouds and a frame of imitation marble is from the 17th century. The rest of the room is of the 19th century as it was later used by Sophie (sister of King Willem III) You can look into this room from the Vestibule, but you can't go into it.

From the Vestibule, you pass through the Old Dining Room #3 . This was the dining room of Stadtholder Willem III before he became King of England. A dining room was something new in the 17th century. People just ate wherever they were - if the Stadtholder said he wanted to eat, a table would be brought to him wherever he was.
Floor boards (and the edge of the carpet) Room #3 -Old Dining Room

Floor boards (and the edge of the carpet) Room #3 -Old Dining Room

Ceiling detail in the Old Dining Room (Room #3) - Old Dining Room

Ceiling detail in the Old Dining Room (Room #3) - Old Dining Room


A characteristic of all the apartments of Willem and Mary are the wood carved door frames with oak and acanthus leaves.

Next was the New Dining Room. Because we were going around on our own (and I just took photos without stopping to read the signs), I did not appreciate the NEW Dining Room.
Het Loo Palace- The New Dining Room

Het Loo Palace- The New Dining Room

Het Loo Palace - The New Dining Room

Het Loo Palace - The New Dining Room


Willem III had Daniel Marot design this room in 1692. Daniel worked for King Louis XIV, but when Louis XIV made it a punishable offense to be Protestant, Daniel fled to Holland, and became the head decorator of Willem III. This room remained the royal dining room for many generations. Commoners were allowed to watch the King eat, and during important dinners there would be musicians. What I thought was most interesting were the dishes in the shape of birds with tail feathers - one with a peacock tail feathers, and one with pheasant feathers.
Het Loo Palace - The New Dining Room

Het Loo Palace - The New Dining Room

Het Loo Palace- The New Dining Room

Het Loo Palace- The New Dining Room


The chandelier is a copy that Queen Wilhelmina had made of a 17th century Andre-Charles Boulle gilded bronze chandelier so it would make the room reflect the era of Willem III.
Het Loo Palace - The New Dining Room

Het Loo Palace - The New Dining Room


the tapestries were based on a design by Marot and symbolize the power of William and Mary
Marble topped table with flowers

Marble topped table with flowers


The Portrait Gallery (Room 5). In the booklet about the palace, this is called White Hall or Stone Room. Most of the time in the 17th century, there were no halls - the rooms just connected with each other.
Portrait Gallery in Room #5

Portrait Gallery in Room #5


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Bob's picture of me in the Portrait Gallery

Bob's picture of me in the Portrait Gallery


The walls of this area are hung with portraits of the Frisian Nassaus. They were the branch of the family of a brother of Willem of Orange. When Willem III died childless, Willem IV came from this branch of the family. I wondered about the equestrian portrait which reminded me of one I saw in the Prado.
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It turns out that it is a portrait of Prins Frederik Hendrik van Oranje Nassau (1584-1647) attributed to Jacob Fransz van der Merck, date unknown. My photo is a little skewed because it was taken from a lower point since I was on a scooter and not standing.

Room #6 is the chapel - we do not seem to have any photos of the chapel which was originally Anglican, built for King Willem III and his wife Mary. After her death in 1962, Queen Wilhelmina lay in state here.

We apparently skipped room #7 (Cabinet of Stadtholder Willem IV) and room #8 the Frisian Cabinet. After Willem III's death, it was 45 years before an Orange was named Stadtholder of the whole Republic. Eventually William IV (who was married to Anne - the daughter of the English King George II) became the new Stadtholder. After room #7 and #8, most people walked up stairs. We took the elevator up
elevator

elevator


to Room #9 the Cabinet of Stadtholder Willem V. We are now into the 18th century, Willem V (1748-1806) was fond of luxurious furniture and loved things from the Far East.
Room #9

Room #9


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Room #9

Room #9

7647529-Het_Loo_Palace_5_Room_9.jpg

Room #10, the Library is once again back in the 17th century -
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this was a room used by King Stadtholder Willem III. Incidentally, Willem III was both a King of England and a Stadtholder of the Netherlands. I wondered why the library was called a Bibliotheek which was so close to the French word for library. I guess maybe both words come from the Latin.
Bibliotheek - Room 10

Bibliotheek - Room 10


The ceiling (stucco with mirrors c 1692) was made by traveling Italian plasterers .
Mirrored ceiling of Room 10 - Library

Mirrored ceiling of Room 10 - Library

The Gallery (#11 Called Royal Showpieces) was under construction so the next thing I have photos of is Room #14 the Bedchamber of Queen Mary II (17th century).

Mary would receive guests here after she made them wait in the antechamber. She had a marvelous bed here that she could show off.
Bed of Queen Mary II

Bed of Queen Mary II


7657846-Fireplace_Apeldoorn.jpg7657844-Another_view_of_the_bed_Apeldoorn.jpgCeiling painting and chandelier

Ceiling painting and chandelier


I also thought the ceiling was interesting. At first I thought it was copper. There was an chamber screen c 1685 which was embroidered (wool and silk) in cross stitch. You also have a good view of the garden from here (and from many of the upstairs rooms), but there was scaffolding outside the windows when we were there.
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The next room (#15 the Dressing Room, Private Closet and Bookroom of Queen Mary II), was very pretty, with a fireplace and tea table. It was hung with tapestries.
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Tea table and fireplace

Tea table and fireplace

Bob's photo of the tapestries with me on the scooter

Bob's photo of the tapestries with me on the scooter


The description said that Mary could read or drink tea from her Chinese porcelain and be undisturbed. There is a painting of her in this room (which I don't think I took a photo of) when she was 15 - the age at which she married Stadtholder Willem III, There is a Gueridon in the shape of a Moorish woman (Antwerp c 1675) by the fireplace
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Around in the back of Queen Mary II's Private Closet was a very strange room which had wallpaper depicting plates on the bottom and on the top there were actual plates hung on the wall. In the 17th century it was fashionable to decorate small rooms from top to bottom with porcelain.
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This set was made in the period of the Chinese emperor Kangxi for export. After that we went past #16 the Main Staircase.
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I only have one photo of this, but this area was designed by Daniel Marot as a square temple in the middle of nature with wall paintings of Eastern princes leaning over the balustrades. During the reign of King Louis Napoleon the 17th century wall paintings were in poor condition and he had them plastered over. In 1902, Queen Wilhemina had them restored.
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Next was the Audience Room -The floor rug is the one that Princess Juliana and Prince Bernhard stood on at their wedding in the Hague. When King Willem I was at Het Loo he would hold an audience every Wednesday. Originally the Audience Room (Room #17) was the largest reception hall, so it would be held here.
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King-Stadtholder Willem III would receive guests standing before his walnut armchair in front of the fireplace. Over the fireplace, the chimney breast (c1680) features the crowned cypher of King-Stadtholder Willem III and Queen Mary II.
Room 17 - Audience Chamber

Room 17 - Audience Chamber


The original wall paintings and hanging have been preserved.
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The ceiling has been painted in such a way as to make the room seem even more imposing.

Then we went into Room #18 which was the first room in the apartments of King-Stadtholder Willem III. This room has leather wall paper which the sign says is practical because leather neutralizes unpleasant odors
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Next were the rooms (19-20) of King-Stadtholder Willem III. He worked in his bedroom because he was very busy and often was ill. He suffered with fainting spells, severe colds and shortness of breath. But even when he was in good health, he would receive counselors in the bed chamber.
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The bed, wall and chairs are covered with red damask which was the fashion of the time. I thought it looked a little like a bordello.
Red damask bed hangings

Red damask bed hangings

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After the Bedchamber of Willem III, we entered the 19th century Drawing Room of King Willem II (Room #21) He was the second Orange King of the Netherlands. He is famous due to his part in the success at the Battle of Waterloo. His state portrait hangs on the rear wall. There is a small painting next to it of his wife Queen Anna Pavlova. She was the sister of two Russian tsars. Typical Russian touches in this room are the desk items of green malachite.
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The Queen's Bathroom puts us firmly in the 20th century. Queen Wilhelmina had her bathroom (Room 24) remodeled with marble walls in 1904 - with modern touches such as heated towel racks and a shower.
214594367658057-Het_Loo_Pala..om_Room_24.jpgHet Loo Palace #12 - The Queens Bathroom -Room #24

Het Loo Palace #12 - The Queens Bathroom -Room #24

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The fixtures were redone for her daughter Juliana in 1948. Even though this is a royal bathroom, it is still small so taking photos is a little more difficult
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Room 25 - the Bedroom of King Wilem III. When Stadholder Willem III became King of England, he decided to sleep in this room from then on. Since then all the Stadtholders and Kings of the House of Orange-Nassau have slept here when they were staying at Het Loo.
Side of King Willem III bedroom

Side of King Willem III bedroom

Nubian cherub lamp

Nubian cherub lamp


He was the first king to have his photograph taken. Photos of him and Queen Emma are on either side of the bed.
King Willem III bedroom

King Willem III bedroom


The furnishings date from the time of King Willem III. In 1890, he died here. Next to the toilet table is his poo chair. At the time the palace did not have running water or sewers.
Majolica vase in the king's bedroom

Majolica vase in the king's bedroom


The Prince Hendrik Staircase-Rm #29 was actually the first place we saw when we entered the palace. Prince Hendrik was the first prince married to a Queen. He was the consort of Queen Wilhelmina. In the time of the Kings Willem (I, II and III) this was the entrance to the apartment of their wives on the ground floor.
Portrait of Fredrich Wilhelm

Portrait of Fredrich Wilhelm


We did not see room #30 the Boudoir of Queen Sophie because this was down the stairs from Room 29. So the next place we went was the Hunting Room of Prince Hendrik (Room#31)
7729326-Antlers_and_cockoo_clock_Apeldoorn.jpg7729327-Chair_Apeldoorn.jpg7729323-More_antlers_Apeldoorn.jpg7729114-Wall_with_antlers_Apeldoorn.jpg Many antlers

Many antlers


We were immediately struck by the plethora of tiny little antlers on the wall. The description of this room says "Prince Hendrik, the husband of Queen Wilhelmina did much for the game population on the Veluwe. He had woods planted on the expansive Royal Estate. Like most of the inhabitants of Het Loo, he was also a hunting enthusiast. The trophies on the walls are from the Netherlands and Mecklenburg, the area of Germany from which he came
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Desk in the Hunting Room

Desk in the Hunting Room


Room 32 was Queen Emma's Drawing Room. She was the second wife of King Willem III, Het Loo Palace, 1888. This room was reconstructed in 1983 with original furniture, although it had originally been in another room of the palace. Emma took the embroidered and printed silk wall coverings to a palace in The Hague when she vacated Het Loo to make room for the next queen
Fireplace

Fireplace

7729331-Portraits_Apeldoorn.jpgReflected in the mirror

Reflected in the mirror

Fancy chandelier

Fancy chandelier

Another photo of the chandelier

Another photo of the chandelier


Right after Queen Emma's drawing room was Room 33, Prince Hendrik's Drawing room. Heinrich Vladimir was the third son of the Grand Duke of Mecklenburg. When he married Queen Wilhelmina, his name was officially changed to the Dutch and was known for the rest of his life as Hendrik, Prince of the Netherlands. Prior to his marriage he made a long journey to India and his drawing room contains souvenirs of that trip including a wall lamp made from an elephant's trunk
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Bear rug on the floor

Bear rug on the floor

Between Prince Hendrik's Drawing Room and Queen Wilhelmina's Study was the music room (Room 34) The Queen's study (room 35) is where Wilhelmina painted and wrote her memoirs after she abdicated in September 1948. There is a model boat, and a brooding statue which I presume is Shakespeare.
Shakespeare and a model boat

Shakespeare and a model boat


Chandelier

Chandelier

Study desk

Study desk

Bookshelves

Bookshelves


Book Rack in the study

Book Rack in the study


Chair either in the Prince or the Queen's drawing room

Chair either in the Prince or the Queen's drawing room


Princess Juliana's Bedroom was Room 36. This has always been the room for the prince and princesses - near to their mother's rooms. When Princess Juliana reached age 18, she decorated the room with contemporary 20's furniture. When she moved to Soestdijk Palace she took a lot of the furnishings with her. After her death they were returned to Het Loo. Also here are the photos of the music room where she took her violin lessons next to the grand piano.
Princess Juliana's Bedroom

Princess Juliana's Bedroom

Piano in the music room (Room #34)

Piano in the music room (Room #34)

Chandelier (music room) and pictures

Chandelier (music room) and pictures

Pictures in the music room (Room #34)

Pictures in the music room (Room #34)

Desk in the music room

Desk in the music room


This is the final room in the Het Loo Palace

We got back to the original elevator
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and went back down to the ground floor where we had to wait for some time for the man to come and unlock the door to let us out. Givng me plenty of time to take photo of the area.
Koning Willem

Koning Willem

Tile picture of Willem III

Tile picture of Willem III

Queen

Queen


stairs to the rest of the palace

stairs to the rest of the palace


Door that has to be unlocked

Door that has to be unlocked


Then we went back to the ticket office place, used the bathrooms and got back on the bus. My back was really hurting so I went back to the back of the bus and lay down on the seats for awhile - that helped.
Lying on the back seat of the bus looking at the sky

Lying on the back seat of the bus looking at the sky


Bob was talking to some people who had moved to Belize.
Road from the bus on the way back to the boat

Road from the bus on the way back to the boat


Bicycle Car

Bicycle Car


Canal on the way back to the boat

Canal on the way back to the boat


Don't Drive Your Car into the Canal sign

Don't Drive Your Car into the Canal sign


When we got back to the docks, they were busy setting up for King's Day.
Following another bus

Following another bus

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River front restaurant

River front restaurant


Following the bus around the waterfront

Following the bus around the waterfront


AmaViola from the bus in Arnherm

AmaViola from the bus in Arnherm


We had a towel rabbit on our bed.
Towel Rabbit

Towel Rabbit


We went to lunch and I didn't bother with the buffet - had the ravioli soup, and the Fisherman's pot which had swordfish, shrimp, calamari and mussels - kind of a Dutch bouillabaisse.
Fisherman's Pot

Fisherman's Pot


Then the boat set sail for Nijmegen. This was a great afternoon - we were able to relax in our room and watch the scenery and life on the river as our boat passed.
Small boat and red marker

Small boat and red marker


Ferry

Ferry

House on the bank

House on the bank

Ducks on shore

Ducks on shore

Signs on shore

Signs on shore

Coal barge

Coal barge

Tug with bikes

Tug with bikes


Tree branch pattern against the sky

Tree branch pattern against the sky

Riprap

Riprap

Beach

Beach

Shoreline

Shoreline

Clouds

Clouds

Stern of a tug with cars

Stern of a tug with cars

Tug with a car on deck

Tug with a car on deck


Clump of trees on shore

Clump of trees on shore


cows in the water

cows in the water

Cows playing by the river

Cows playing by the river


Building on shore

Building on shore


Biker on shore keeping pace with us

Biker on shore keeping pace with us


Bike rider by the river

Bike rider by the river


Shore and hills

Shore and hills


Walkers on shore

Walkers on shore

green shore and green channel markers

green shore and green channel markers


and then when we got to Nijmegan
shore near Nijmegen

shore near Nijmegen

Strange building

Strange building

Red and white striped aid to navigation

Red and white striped aid to navigation

Boats moored

Boats moored


local barge boats

local barge boats


Nijmegen boat - blue

Nijmegen boat - blue


Pedestrian bridge

Pedestrian bridge


Pedestrian and road bridge

Pedestrian and road bridge


We went under a big bridge
bridge

bridge


Bridge end

Bridge end


Looking under the bridge

Looking under the bridge

Green channel marker

Green channel marker


Radar under the bridge

Radar under the bridge


Nijmegen Bridge

Nijmegen Bridge


Bridge with green channel marker

Bridge with green channel marker


Nijmegen Bridge

Nijmegen Bridge


Nijmegen Bridges

Nijmegen Bridges


Viking docking point - Nijmegen

Viking docking point - Nijmegen


Nijmegen waterfront

Nijmegen waterfront


Ice Cream cones - restaurant on shore

Ice Cream cones - restaurant on shore


Crewman hanging off the side of the boat to help docking

Crewman hanging off the side of the boat to help docking


tour boats

tour boats


Bow of a moored river boat

Bow of a moored river boat


Our boat reflected in another river boat

Our boat reflected in another river boat


Tauck boat moored at the Nijmegen docks

Tauck boat moored at the Nijmegen docks


Tauck boat central logo

Tauck boat central logo


Stern of a Swiss river boat

Stern of a Swiss river boat


Man and his children watching us dock

Man and his children watching us dock


When we got to Nijmegen, I did not get off the boat to walk up the hill to town
Steeple

Steeple


Chimney pots

Chimney pots


and those people that did said it was a very steep hill and very cold and windy. I just wrote up the 22nd and edited photos. Today photos were easier than yesterday because I had the time synced on the cameras and yesterday Bob's was 6 hours ahead of mine. At dinner we ate with three people from Idaho. I had a shrimp appetizer,
Shrimp and Pineapple Salsa

Shrimp and Pineapple Salsa


Poultry broth soup

Poultry broth soup


and
Beef Rib eye, baked potato and white asparagus

Beef Rib eye, baked potato and white asparagus


Bob had the same. then I had Ice Coupe for dessert.
Church in the landscape from out cabin

Church in the landscape from out cabin


We will be in Antwerp tomorrow.

Posted by greatgrandmaR 11:42 Archived in Netherlands Tagged cruise_ship_visit Comments (0)

Antwerp Then (1950) and Now (2016) - 24 April

25 April - a Rest Day

storm
View 2015 Costa Rica (plus 1996 and 2008) & 2016 Tulip Cruise on greatgrandmaR's travel map.

April 24
For Antwerp I picked the Ruben's house tour because I had photos of Daddy's from there
Stained glass detail from 1950

Stained glass detail from 1950


and I wanted to see the zoo and the Central RR station, because I had photos from those to places also. I had wanted to shop, but of course it was Sunday and the shops were not open.

It was rainy and cold, and I was warned about cobblestones, but we put on our coats and I put on my raincoat and we ventured forth.
Crossing from one boat to another

Crossing from one boat to another


We met the guide and it started to rain. Bob had a poncho and he put it on. Then it started to sleet or hail. I got off the scooter and went under the roof of the parking shed that was there but there was a 2.5 foot high barrier to get the scooter over so Bob sat on the scooter with his poncho spread over it for awhile and finally gave in and lifted the scooter to where it was more sheltered. It was both wet and cold. I had not realized that we would walk the distance to Ruben's house. The streets were OK for the scooter but it was raining and very windy (some people's umbrellas were turned inside out) and I was afraid to take my camera out. I tried taking photos with my cell phone but it was hard to manage both the scooter and the cell phone
Accidental selfie in the rain

Accidental selfie in the rain


because there is no handle on the cell phone and I have to hold it in my hand instead of hanging it around my neck
Guide in the rain

Guide in the rain


Antwerp street in the driving rain

Antwerp street in the driving rain


We got to Rubin's house and everyone had to put all purses into lockers.
lockers at Rubens house

lockers at Rubens house


The guide said that I could take the scooter in to the studio part (which was very big - they had the big pictures there and could take them out with a crane) and into the garden but I could not take it into the house itself. This was not a surprise so I was not unbearably disappointed. So we went into the studio. There was a ramp into the studio and I went down faster than either of us would have thought was reasonable (it was steep and the scooter has no brakes, so I basically slid down almost into the wall at the end). By this time my back was painful and I felt a bit nauseated. We sat on benches while the guide explained Rubens paintings.
The Bear Hunt

The Bear Hunt


I do not remember why this one is called the Bear Hunt when the hunter obviously has a deer. The guide explained how the apprentice system worked. Rubens was a rich man - he had a house and a studio in town and a couple of big country places. He would do the sketches of the paintings and then the apprentices would fill in the blanks. If you wanted him to paint it himself, you paid him extra.
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Adam and Eve

Adam and Eve


In Rubens' day, being fat meant that you were rich, and being pale meant that you didn't have to work out in the sun.
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Rubens self portrait

Rubens self portrait

A Lady at the Fish Market

A Lady at the Fish Market


And explained that each painting was like a movie - each part of the painting had a meaning. For instance in this picture, the fact that there are apples at a fish market has a meaning (I remember it being something about showing that the lady is having an affair) Then we went into the garden
Garden gate

Garden gate

Ruben's garden

Ruben's garden

Pagoda in the garden

Pagoda in the garden

Blooming wisteria

Blooming wisteria

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and I took photos of the scaffolding and the details of the house. There were two sections to the house and they were two different architectural styles - one half had scaffolding on it.
Scaffolding on  Rubens house

Scaffolding on Rubens house

Scaffolding

Scaffolding


archway

archway


and the statues that Daddy had photos of. I didn't get a photo of the stained glass in the dining room but at least I got one photo.
Statues in the garden of Ruben's house

Statues in the garden of Ruben's house


Statues 2016

Statues 2016

Then and now

Then and now


Then I went back to the entrance area and bought a small notepad as a gift for our cat sitter
large_IMG_6215.jpgIMG_6216.jpg
and then I lay down on a bench and tried to straighten out my back so it wouldn't hurt. They picked us up after the house tour and we continued walking. It was better weather now - the sun was out although it was still cold.
Tree in bloom

Tree in bloom


Advertisement for a furniture store

Advertisement for a furniture store


We walked through another building which the guide wanted to show us.
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approach

approach


chandelier that the guide wanted to show us

chandelier that the guide wanted to show us


leaving the building

leaving the building


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The severed hand is the symbol of Antwerp
Antwerp hand

Antwerp hand


The story goes that a giant was charging a toll to cross his bridge and if you did not pay, he chopped off your hand. A young man got annoyed at all this hand cutting, found the giant, cut off his hand and threw it in the river. The name Antwerp is said to derive from the Dutch “to throw a hand,” when the city was founded a thousand years ago. There are candies and cookies in the shape of this hand.
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I really wanted to go back to the ship. But we were apparently in a pedestrian area and even on the street the taxis have to be called or picked up in a taxi stand - you can't hail them in the street. They took us to a taxi stand and left us but there were no taxis there.
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So after five minutes or so, We went to a cafe (which was not really open but there was a fire there in the fireplace) and asked a lady to call us a cab, which she did.
Street near the cafe

Street near the cafe


When the cab came, he didn't speak much English, but as long as I had got to a warm place where I could sit comfortably, I decided to see if I could get a photo of the Central RR station. I showed him the photos and he was entranced and asked if he could take a photo of them with his phone. He took very seriously getting to the place where the photos were taken and he also tried to show me some of Antwerp
Government building

Government building

Sint Joriskerk (St. George Church) a Roman Catholic church

Sint Joriskerk (St. George Church) a Roman Catholic church

National Bank of Belgium

National Bank of Belgium


IMG_5258.jpgNational bank of belgium

National bank of belgium

Leopold I, who became the first king of Belgium in 1831

Leopold I, who became the first king of Belgium in 1831

Leopold I, from the other side

Leopold I, from the other side


Hoboken electric trolley/tram

Hoboken electric trolley/tram

IMG_5255.jpgtram schedule

tram schedule

signs

signs


He took us to the side of the Central station next to the zoo
Side by the zoo

Side by the zoo


(There was a statue of a man riding a camel there) . The central station was built between 1895 and 1905 by King Leopold with the profits from ivory and rubber in the Congo.
Zoo entrance 2016

Zoo entrance 2016


Zoo side of the Central Station

Zoo side of the Central Station

Central Station tram

Central Station tram


and then he took us around to the side where Daddy had taken the photos and I took pictures there.
Along one side

Along one side


Central RR station

Central RR station


1950 on the left

1950 on the left

Closer and this time 1950 on the right

Closer and this time 1950 on the right


Now to get back to the ship.
War Memorial - Antwerp City Park

War Memorial - Antwerp City Park


Boula theater

Boula theater

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I had the foresight to have the plan of the day which had the address where the ship would dock, but that was a long dock and he kept going to the edge and the ship would not be there.
Hetsteen - youth theater

Hetsteen - youth theater


Tall ship at another place on the docks

Tall ship at another place on the docks


While doing that the fare went up 10 € Eventually it was 33€ and Bob gave him 35 €.
AmaViola - bikes on deck

AmaViola - bikes on deck


And I gave him the prints so he didn't have to take a photo with his cell phone. I do have the originals after all. We were so late back that all that we could have for lunch was the soup.
Soup for lunch

Soup for lunch

Raspberry yoghurt

Raspberry yoghurt

Raspberry and blueberry

Raspberry and blueberry

ice cream

ice cream

Tulips in the lounge

Tulips in the lounge

Looking from the lounge forward

Looking from the lounge forward


The group we were with were to have gone to the cathedral to see the Ruben's paintings there but could not go in because it was Sunday and they were having services, so we really didn't miss much.
IMG_5292.JPGIMG_5281.JPGbarge tug

barge tug

Tug

Tug

Red buoy

Red buoy


storm clouds

storm clouds

storm clouds over the river

storm clouds over the river

burning off gas

burning off gas


Dinner was a Belgian dinner. I had the Belgian endive salad with glazed walnuts and blue cheese, asparagus soup and mahi mahi
Belgium endive and walnut salad

Belgium endive and walnut salad


Wild Rice and Tropical Salsa (in the Mahi Mahi Filet)

Wild Rice and Tropical Salsa (in the Mahi Mahi Filet)


Dessert was a Belgian chocolate buffet. I ate too much chocolate.
Chocolate buffet

Chocolate buffet

Choices from the chocolate buffet

Choices from the chocolate buffet


We went overnight to Terneuzen - actually we started at dinner time and there were waves crashing against the windows in the dining room which is on the lowest deck.

April 25th
I woke up about 4:30 and looked at the bow camera and we were here. We are beside a lock. The captain has decided that the waves and wind in the North Sea make it too dangerous for us to actually go through the lock and go to Middleburg (this is a river boat and not an ocean going vessel after all), so we are staying in Terneuzen all day today. It is still rainy and cold
Lock

Lock


AmaStella across from us

AmaStella across from us


The expeditions today were to Ghent, Bruges and Middleburg, and I decided not to go on any of them. They are all walking tours and I really have not much interest in those towns - it is too much trouble to go to just to have a shopping opportunity. So we had a nice restful day on the ship
Fruit on the buffet

Fruit on the buffet


At lunch, the people who just went to Ghent came back (after a cold and rainy walk) and we had
lentil soup

lentil soup


Caronade Flamade

Caronade Flamade

Table at the end of the dining room and waitress going into the kitchen

Table at the end of the dining room and waitress going into the kitchen


And then Bob went to the ice cream section of the buffet and got ice cream for us for dessert
Bob at the ice cream table

Bob at the ice cream table

Elevator sign on the ship

Elevator sign on the ship


In the afternoon we had tea (sandwiches and cakes). For dinner I had the
foie gras pate

foie gras pate


and then because I didn't want French Onion soup (which is often too salty) or the cream of fennel soup, I had two appetizers - for the second one I got the peach cocktail.
Peach Cocktail - sparkling wine

Peach Cocktail - sparkling wine


Then for the main course I had
Spinach quiche

Spinach quiche

Bob's fish dinner

Bob's fish dinner

Dessert

Dessert


We left for Willemstad. It seemed like they had trouble getting the engines started. But we finally got underway. Bob thought that the injectors were clogged or something.
Red and white sculpture

Red and white sculpture

Yellow and black striped barge

Yellow and black striped barge


Then when I got up to go to the bathroom in the night, I looked at the bow camera picture (which they have in infrared for in the dark), I would have sworn we were on a collision course with another ship or something, but we didn't hit it whatever it was.

Posted by greatgrandmaR 12:03 Archived in Belgium Comments (0)

Wandering Willemstad - 26 April

Photo Safari

sunny
View 2015 Costa Rica (plus 1996 and 2008) & 2016 Tulip Cruise on greatgrandmaR's travel map.

Tuesday morning,
Bob walked down the stairs and I took the elevator

Bob walked down the stairs and I took the elevator


we had breakfast.
green tea

green tea


Belgian waffles

Belgian waffles


Our room was on the water side, so we could see the ducks swimming around the edges of the marshland. We saw ducks, and a swan and also some birds I have tentatively identified as coots. It was very cold and somewhat windy, but the birds seemed to be going about their business as usual.
7622838-BIrd_Watching.jpg7622839-BIrd_Watching.jpg7622840-BIrd_Watching.jpg866718197618509-View_from_ou..Willemstad.jpg7622841-BIrd_Watching.jpg7622842-BIrd_Watching.jpgIMG_3488.jpg
We were docked right in town
Town from the dock

Town from the dock


Town from the ship dock

Town from the ship dock


and were scheduled to hear an organ recital but Bob was needing to stay close to the bathroom so I decided to go to Willemstad on my own. I just wanted to take some pictures. I could see a windmill from our cabin,
Windmill from the ship (over the marina)

Windmill from the ship (over the marina)


and it appeared to be a sunny day (although it was cold)
Sign at the entrance to the port

Sign at the entrance to the port


There was a Belgian Cemetery listed on the map and since that was close to the ship, Bob went and took pictures there,
Gate Belgian War Cemetery

Gate Belgian War Cemetery


The Belgian tribute cemetery in Willemstad (Moerdijk) contains the graves of 159 Belgian soldiers. There is a concrete memorial which is 1 meter high, 3 meter wide and 3 meter deep with the names of 159 Belgian soldiers. The cemetery was dedicated on the 14th of April 1950 and officially opened on the 29th of May 1950.
7619160-Belgian_War_Cemetery_1940.jpg
On the sign which was placed next to the fence is a sign which says (loosely translated)

BELGIAN MILITARY CEMETERY 1940

On this spot is the common grave of the 159 Belgian soldiers who died in the Netherlands during World War Two. Most of them were captured near Gent on the 28th of May 1940 by the German army. They were transported in four ships to a prisoner of war camp in Germany. The ships followed the route from the Westerschelde via the channel through Zuid - Beveland and the Oosterschelde to the Hollands Diep. Close to Willemstad on the 30th of May 1940, one of the ships, the "Rhenus 127" sailed over a German magnetic mine, which made the overloaded ship with 1,200 prisoners explode in the middle. It broke in two and sank. Most of the prisoners were rescued and were cared for by the citizens of Willemstad. But almost 200 Belgian soldiers drowned. Most of them found their last resting place in this cemetery. Later on a few other Belgian soldiers who died elsewhere in the Netherlands were also laid to rest here
Sign in two languages

Sign in two languages


The side with the inscription in French

The side with the inscription in French

The side with the inscription in Dutch which says HERE LIES 134 BELGIANS fallen for their fatherland and ours 30 may 1940

The side with the inscription in Dutch which says HERE LIES 134 BELGIANS fallen for their fatherland and ours 30 may 1940


In 1963 they added two memorial stones to the monument.
One of the two extra grave markers

One of the two extra grave markers


I went on a more wide ranging safari. First I had to get off the ship but there was sand at the bottom of the ramp which of course meant that I got stuck there.
Next to the dock

Next to the dock


7618514-AmaViola_at_the_dock_Willemstad.jpg
A very brief setback and soon overcome.
Windmill from the ship

Windmill from the ship


I went and took photos of the lighthouse and what I thought was the fire station next to it. (It turned out to be a lifeboat station)
7618768-Willemstad_Light_Willemstad.jpgWillemstad Light  from the water side

Willemstad Light from the water side

22684097618766-Willemstad_L..Willemstad.jpgWillemstad Light and rescue building

Willemstad Light and rescue building


This is a currently inactive (since 1989) lighthouse located on the Lantaarndijk on the waterfront of Willemstad, overlooking the Hollands Diep, a segment of the lower Maas east of the junction of the Haringvliet and Brouwershaven, the estuaries north and south of Goeree-Overflakkee. The station was established in 1820, but the old tower was destroyed in WWII. So the current 33 ft square cylindrical brick tower with lantern and gallery, unpainted; lantern painted yellow with a red conical roof only dates back to 1947. The original lighthouse was an interesting pentagonal cast iron skeletal tower. There may be a small museum in the lighthouse, but I did not investigate this. The lighthouse is located next to what I thought was a firehouse - the sign on it translates as Rescue. But pieter_jan_v 5 of VirtualTourist explained that Reddingsbrigade = LIFEBOAT brigade so it isn't a firehouse. And that makes sense as it is right next to a lighthouse which is for sailors. There was a marina past the lighthouse
View of the river with the marina

View of the river with the marina


Battery Marina

Battery Marina


The marina on the other side near the lighthouse is called Battery Marina (Jachthaven De Batterij). It is where the Dutch came ashore in 1793 and overpowered the French (Napoleon). Google translation of this event:
Carel van Boetzelaer decided, the then governor, that attack was the best defense. In a battalion in the inner gathered early morning of March 15 to 58 volunteers from the State troops. By ship they were brought up just outside the Water. In silence they went ashore and got on their hands and feet on the Lantern Dijkje direction Westdijk. Once at the French battery, the assailants were unexpectedly and brutally overpowered. Shortly after this attack the enemy's drums were stirred and wisely blown retreat ..

Then I went out into the town (which is inside a perfect star shaped fort). If you look at a map of Willemstad you will see that the original small town is inside of a star shaped fort (seven points) with a moat around the fort. The fort walls, covered with grass are all around the small town.
water entrance - gap in the moat

water entrance - gap in the moat


This is an old map which shows the sea gate -right - Willemstad

This is an old map which shows the sea gate -right - Willemstad


Jeroen van der Werf describes the area (and I don't understand the description because I'm not familiar with the Old Dutch System) so I am quoting him here: The fortifications were designed according to the Old Dutch System, only here the flanks of the bastions' are not perpendicular to the curtain walls but have a retreated curved shape .. and are quite short. In later years some of these flanks were modified to make them perpendicular to the curtain wall. Apart from the walls facing the sea, which were revetted in brick, all the ramparts were unrevetted earthworks. The seaward front of the town consists of two bastions with water in front of them. Between this water and the river (which in the past was part of the sea) there is a glacis, which prevented ships from coming too close to the walls and gave extra protection against enemy fire......the overall form of the current fortress dates from the 1680's
Fort wall near the lighthouse

Fort wall near the lighthouse


Fuel barge in front of AmaViola

Fuel barge in front of AmaViola


In addition to marinas for yachts, Willemstad is also regularly visited by river cruise ships, and has a dock and facilities for these ships. There is a fuel provider there (Olie-Benzine) which appears to be a barge which also has gasoline. It says bunkering is available.
Fuel barge

Fuel barge

Sign and stop light at entrance

Sign and stop light at entrance


Sign about the 2014 winner

Sign about the 2014 winner


The Entente Floral competition of Europe (Willemstat was the 2014 winner) is a civil initiative involving 55 million Residents living in 25,000 towns and cities that aims to make areas more beautiful and livable. The competition wants the streets to be tidy, the front gardens neat, and the balconies are decorated with flowers. It is run by the AEFP (The European Association for Flowers and Landscape) stands for:
•Awareness among those in charge of our towns and villages, elected or others, of respect for the landscape and of the requirement of an environmental /ecological approach.
•A planned approach to the improvement of the quality of life of the inhabitants of towns and villages.
•Convincing people to become active participants.
•Awareness and educational initiatives which will increase respect for quality actions
•The vital role played by education, training and proper information flows.
•The importance of a well structured communication policy

Pansies

Pansies


More flowers

More flowers


Clair de Lune - the bike barge

Clair de Lune - the bike barge

Sign about Bike Barge holidays

Sign about Bike Barge holidays


I saw a boat advertising the boat-bike tours from a company called Hat-Tours. Two of the tours are:

Highlights of Holland (HOH)
Beach, Netherlands, Amsterdam, Haarlem, Leiden, Towns (historic), Travel guidance, City walk, Museum, Windmill, IJssel Lake, Hoorn, Bathing resort, Holland, Barge, Flower Park Keukenhof, Fishing village, Zaanse Schans, Sea

Castles & Walled Towns (KVP)
Hanseatic town, Amsterdam, Castle, City walk, Museum, Nature, Barge, River, Fishing village, National Park, Harderwijk, Holland, Netherlands, Travel guidance, Towns (historic)

Clair de Lune - the bike barge

Clair de Lune - the bike barge


Old Dutch Boat

Old Dutch Boat

Guardhouse at the entrance from the port

Guardhouse at the entrance from the port

Wall opposite the guardhouse

Wall opposite the guardhouse


The fort was built with two entrances - one if by land and one if by sea. The land entrance has a gatehouse where the gate keeper lived and that still survives. I did not get out to the gatehouse, but this was the sea entrance
The Arsenal

The Arsenal


I took some photos of the Arsenal (which is right inside the sea gate) but found it confusing to identify it, because during the Napoleonic Wars there was another armory which is where there is a warehouse now, and that photo kept coming up.
Possible warehouse location of the first arsenal

Possible warehouse location of the first arsenal


I was only able to identify it positively after I saw an article which said that a subsequent owner of the building put bells on the front.
Carillon Bells

Carillon Bells


In 1791 Prince William V told the State Council that he was willing to contribute to the reconstruction of the armory at Willemstad. The new one would have the same length, but they would widen the shore side so the total width of the new building would be about 44 feet. The new arsenal alsol needed a cistern with a capacity of four hundred tons of water for the garrison. The Arsenal was designed by the architect Philip William of Orange Schonck. It was originally divided into three naves with the corresponding three-part facade. However, its design has since been adapted. This is described (as translated from the Dutch) as: The tripodal ground floor with two rows of thick wooden poles, for practical reasons has been changed to a naves, whereby there were also needed instead of three, but two ports. Those gates were provided with a hard stone classicist frame in which black ornament painting. The keystones show to deter a Medusa head with snakes and two swords surrounded by two eagles.
After 1926, the arsenal remained in use for storage of military equipment. In the late sixties, the building was sold to Mr F. van Welzenes, who applied to a carillon bells. On January 19, 1973 the completely restored Arsenal was officially opened and is now used for cultural events like concerts and exhibitions as well as for receptions.
The Arsenal from near Anno 1610

The Arsenal from near Anno 1610

Hotel and restaurant

Hotel and restaurant


Near the Arsenal was a hotel, Het Wapen van Willemstad: The Weapon of Willemstad This is the oldest hotel-restaurant of Willemstad. It underwent a thorough renovation in February 2013.
Menu board outside

Menu board outside


Water pump opposite the hotel

Water pump opposite the hotel


Trash can

Trash can


Tourist information board

Tourist information board


There is a bulletin board with Tourist Information by the Old Town Hall.
Handicapped parking

Handicapped parking


Old Town Hall and cannon

Old Town Hall and cannon


Old Town Hall from the side

Old Town Hall from the side


Our information from the ship said In front of the harbor, the 16th century former Stadhuis is distinguished by it's octagonal tower, double curved gable and black and white shutters.
Top of the tower

Top of the tower


Town hall mermaid wind vane

Town hall mermaid wind vane


In the Napoleons time the tower top was replaced by a semaphore, but after the fall of Napoleonn in 1815 the top was reconstructed.
Old Town Hall

Old Town Hall


Tower from below

Tower from below


The Old Town Hall was build on order of Prince Maurits in 1587. The building was was designed in such a way, that on Sundays church services could be held (there was no funding to build two buildings at that time).
Detail of the arches on the ground floor

Detail of the arches on the ground floor


It now houses the Ceramic Museum (Ceramisch Museum), with pottery and other wares (17th-20th centuries) recovered by excavation
Old Town Hall Tower

Old Town Hall Tower

Town crest over the Old Town Hall door

Town crest over the Old Town Hall door


Bellevuw Restaurant and Wine Bar

Bellevuw Restaurant and Wine Bar


This is right on the harbor, According to the website, there is the Merlot Winebar adjacent to the terrace along the inner harbor of Willemstad and the Salon Liem Sian &; Salon Wigant upstairs. The Traces of War website says: Willemstad was right in the mobilization for a location that was occupied by quartermasters and the staff of the Inundation Station Willemstad. On 24 august 1939 were first mobilized soldiers already arrived in Willemstad and they were housed in Hotel Bellevue and Het Wapen van Willemstad
7621396-Restaurant_and_Wine_Bar.jpg
alley beside the Bellevue

alley beside the Bellevue


Past the Old Town Hall were several restaurants which were not open at the early hour I was there.
Bora Bora

Bora Bora


City Cafe

City Cafe


Facade of a building near the town hall

Facade of a building near the town hall


Listed Buildings

Listed Buildings


Listed Building

Listed Building


Pretty old building

Pretty old building

Roof top detail

Roof top detail


As I was going down the center of the main street,
Main street

Main street

ATM?

ATM?


Tree buds against the sky

Tree buds against the sky

Street lamp

Street lamp


Gecko logo seats and table

Gecko logo seats and table


Gecko

Gecko


Texaco station on the main street

Texaco station on the main street

Close-up of the Texaco station

Close-up of the Texaco station


Truck getting gas

Truck getting gas


I was taking notice of the various shopping places,
Postcards and souvenir shop with no ramp

Postcards and souvenir shop with no ramp


and I saw Het Rozemarijntje with a ramp. So when it started to rain, I turned around and went in with my scooter.
Front of the shop

Front of the shop


The shop keeper was very friendly and we had a nice chat. She showed me a paper with a photo which showed that it snowed in Amsterdam the previous day. This is mostly a book store, but they do have some other items.
Cards and books

Cards and books


I got a tin of Dutch cookies, some coasters in the shape of house facades, a cute child's book about a cow, and a small tin of candy for 21 €
tin of Dutch cookies

tin of Dutch cookies


Coasters

Coasters


Stroopwafel (Dutch waffle cookie)

Stroopwafel (Dutch waffle cookie)

The Cow who Fell in the Canal book

The Cow who Fell in the Canal book

Page in the Cow Who Fell in the Canal book

Page in the Cow Who Fell in the Canal book

Candy tin

Candy tin

Two gifts

Two gifts


There were also some nice wooden wine containers in the shape of Dutch row houses, but I was afraid they would be crushed in my suitcase
Wine containers upper left and foods

Wine containers upper left and foods


Flowers in the sidewalk outside the shop

Flowers in the sidewalk outside the shop


When the rain/sleet stopped, I left and went over and took photos of the windmill and some of the fort walls, and the marina. Unfortunately, I this meant that missed going to the Dome Church
Dome Church

Dome Church


The Dome church was heavily damaged during the artillery shellings of the Allies between 30-10-1944 and 06-11-1944. The church was restored in 1959.
Trees and houses

Trees and houses


Street and front gardens

Street and front gardens


Path around the walls

Path around the walls


Another view of the path

Another view of the path


There is a path along the fort walls, which I did not take. I did see it, or part of it when I went up to the windmill.
Stream and bridge

Stream and bridge


xIMG_5456.jpg
Wheels to control water?

Wheels to control water?


large_xIMG_5458.jpg
There are also some big wheels which I think must be some kind of sluice gate which regulates water flow, although I don't know exactly how they work. I saw one right up next to the windmill and another one down by the stream
Jeroen van der Werf in Fortified Places says"
To regulate the water level in front of the two seaward bastions there are sluices in the western dam and near the harbour on the eastern side. On the harbour side a second sluice is made to flood the ditch inside the town. To regulate the water level in the ditch surrounding the town and the covered way'as well as a means to flood the polder a third sluice was made near the only landward gate to the town. Protecting this gate is the only demi-lune'in the fortress* But he has no photos of the sluices so I don't know whether these are what he was talking about or not
Earthworks from behind the lighthouse

Earthworks from behind the lighthouse


Fort wall near the windmill

Fort wall near the windmill


Another view from near

Another view from near


There are good views of the fort walls below the windmill
Windmill

Windmill


Windmill - closer

Windmill - closer


Windmill

Windmill


d'Orangemolen

d'Orangemolen


The town also has a windmill high up above the town. In the 1500's the land was a muddy marshland, used by shepherds. A Dutch marquis turned the area into a polder. This polder (called originally Ruigenhil) was in a very strategic position between the south and north parts of the Netherlands and on an important Dutch river, the Maas. William of Orange (aka William the Silent) caused the fort with a moat 125 feet wide to be built to protect against the Spanish, and after he died his son the town went to his son Maurits. The windmill which was originally a flour mill is called d'Orangemolen. The windmill is up high on the moat wall and is visible from just about everywhere in town. It is very old, having been built in 1734 as a corn mill. It has been decommissioned, but visits are possible by appointment. This windmill was the one that I saw up close on this trip. One side of the windmill is white and the other side is brown (described in a datebase as a round stone mill partly plastered and whitewashed. The hood is covered with roofing felt.
Next to the windmill

Next to the windmill


Close to the windmill looking up

Close to the windmill looking up


Windmill from Marina

Windmill from Marina


Road past the marina near the windmill

Road past the marina near the windmill


Marina from the base of the windmill

Marina from the base of the windmill


Ramp to the docks with fort wall in back

Ramp to the docks with fort wall in back


This is one of the two marinas in Willemstad. It is below the windmill on the same side as where AmaViola docked. Most of the boats appeared to be sailboats - there was a forest of masts. Sailing is big in the Netherlands. There is a nearby chandler (a store to buy boat stuff) called Yacht Willemstad.
Yacht Willemstad

Yacht Willemstad


Pub Anno 1610

Pub Anno 1610


Anno 1610 is the oldest Pub in Willemstad.
't Pumpke

't Pumpke


't Pumpke has a covered and heated terrace so that you can enjoy the view but be out of the weather. Back to the AmaViola
AmaViola

AmaViola


AmaViola at the dock

AmaViola at the dock


Vista

Vista


There was a restaurant out on the end of the dock past where the AmaViola was docked. Their website says that VISTA stands for vastness by which I think they mean that all the way out there you have good views all around you.
7621876-At_the_end_of_the_dock.jpg7621877-At_the_end_of_the_dock.jpg
We had lunch (I had pumpkin soup and spare ribs)
IMG_5473.jpgIMG_5474.jpg
Flowers on the ship

Flowers on the ship


and then we decided not to take the excursion to Kinderkdjilk because Bob was still sticking close to the bathroom and I had already been there with our granddaughter in 2009. Our ship had to leave the dock a bit early - there were white caps on the larger body of water beyond us.
View from our cabin near Dortdrect

View from our cabin near Dortdrect


We rode the ship around to Dortdrect. The people who went to Kinderdjilk had a very cold, windy and wet trip. That evening, we had the talk about disembarkation, and met the crew.
Meeting the crew - Chefs

Meeting the crew - Chefs


Our cabin steward

Our cabin steward


Wine glasses and tulips

Wine glasses and tulips


Appetizer

Appetizer


For dinner there was a
California Sushi Roll

California Sushi Roll

Salmon, scallops, shirmp appetizer

Salmon, scallops, shirmp appetizer

Crayfish Bisque and Puff Pastry Strip

Crayfish Bisque and Puff Pastry Strip


Sorbet(which had alcohol in the bottom)

Sorbet(which had alcohol in the bottom)


Bob's Sea bass and saffron rice

Bob's Sea bass and saffron rice

my Roast Beef Tenderloin

my Roast Beef Tenderloin

Stracciatella Ice Cream and Chocolate Sauce

Stracciatella Ice Cream and Chocolate Sauce

Petit Fours

Petit Fours

Tomorrow we will be in Amsterdam and will go see Tulips

Posted by greatgrandmaR 08:29 Archived in Netherlands Comments (0)

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